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ENFp Uncovered
by David Rosenfield

Like the ENTp, the ENFp is driven by an overwhelming desire for attention and to be liked. Unlike the ENTp, the ENFp is not naturally rational and objective in his outlook. Where the ENTp calculates and plots to get what he wants, the ENFp acts on impulse and gut feeling. While this gut feeling is often ...
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Your Comments: 1+ 22+ 29+ 44+ 58+ 68+ 85+ 95+
C58 i do agree with the greener-pastures statement. and i know all personality types vary and within one there are several more variations, but i dont find myself trying to be the center of attention. i dont seek it nor do i hide from it- although i can be a bit loud at times. i think one of our biggest frustrations is being misunderstood. we love hearing opinions, but we expect to be heard as well. i think our biggest flaw is becoming blinded by the ideal instead of what is there- especially in close relationships. in fact, the less i know people the more i like them(: -- a fellow enfp
C59 i feel like this description only talks about one half of the ENFP personality. the drive for meaning is something the ENFP values over pretty much anything. their creativity should also be talked about more, as it is quite central to who they are. -- Anonymous
C60 i'm a 16 year old enfp, and this is mostly accurate... i do enjoy being liked, and i am high maintenance. its something i'm working on. i wouldn't say i'm DRIVEN by my desire to be liked though, just that i want it. the truth is i'm driven by inspiration, if anything. i'm also driven by any chance of real love. i think i'm anything but superficial. perhaps extremely AWARE of how to be superficial, and what it means to be that, but i don't follow those ways. not deep down, at the heart of my being, anyway. -- ENFP, Isabel_
C61 I agree with c20 100%. C6 is right on as well. I think this description would be far more accurate coming from a female ENFP. -- Anonymous
C62 Simply put, if you feel you ARE an ENFp, your opinions are biased and hardly worth considering, due to your inherent nature. -- M.Lopez
C63 I wish the ESFj uncovered profile was written by an ESFj. -- Anonymous
C64 There is some accuracy in this article. The first part about the gut feeling is true especially when compared to ENTPs, it is exactly that. We ENFP don't know how to kiss people's ass even when we should, just for the sake of building a list of useful contacts that we would need for opportunistic reasons in the future, but I've never burnt bridges however and don't relate to that at all. I truly feel sorry for ENFPs who bounce from job to job and never apply themselves to the mastery of one skill. It's true that we are very adaptable, fast learners and usually can demonstrate our best leadership skills in situations of crisis. But it sounds like the description above would be that of an ENFP who is lost or who would be very unhappy. Maybe ENFPs need to make it a goal to find a purpose in their life. Without it, then they remain the description above. Those who find it are not like this. ENFPs are also as much idea people than they are people people. They like causes and gathering people in making it happen. For successful ENFPs, this picture is unnacurate. -- Anonymous
C65 yea sound kind of like one of my evil roomates. some of it could also apply to the esfj one, too. they are both very immature. extraverts in general seem very manipulative and judgemental. probably because they talk too much. some introverts suck too, though. -- Anonymous
C66 I haven't read all of the comments, so sorry if anyone has addressed this issue: I'm a 22-year-old ENFP female, and I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. (Incedently, this diagnosis was brought about by my identical twin sister, a total enTp, being diagnosed, and if you aren't familiar, ADD is HIGHLY genetic.) Subsequently I've made researching this "disability" (which is actually recognized under the ADA) my latest mini-obsession. The reason I was struck by this description is that it reads like a complete symptom sheet for ADD (avoiding 'boring tasks' to your own detriment, losing interest 'too quickly'). I was diagnosed a few months ago ago after my parents watched my 3.8ish gpa drop to a 3.1 in less than 2 years for no apparent reason, but looking back, it's exremely clear that I've exhibited symptoms of this "disease" my entire life, but, given the structure of high school, parental oversight, etc. was able to effectively manage the "symptoms". Since accepting the fact that the negative aspects of my personality may be caused by ADD (which, despite it's somewhat negative stigma, is a 100% physiological difference between levels of activity in my frontal lobe compared to the average person), I feel like a million pounds has been lifted from my shoulders. I have also begun taking steps to address my ADD which, though very new, seem like they may be a light at the end of a darkish, unenlightened tunnel. For example, I could honestly write about this topic all day but I need to get going (I'm workign on my "time sense", a tip i got from http://www.thrivewithadd.com, and I allotted myself 10 minutes for this comment and I'm way over, big surprise.) I'd really like to hear input from any other ENFP's whove been accurately diagnosed with ADD, because from my research ADD is often misdiagnosed in adults, especially women, because on the surface it shares many symptoms with depression, anxiety disorders, etc. -- Adrian-ENFP
C67 I haven't read all of the comments, so sorry if anyone has addressed this issue: I'm a 22-year-old ENFP female, and I was recently diagnosed with adult ADHD. (Incedently, this diagnosis was brought about by my identical twin sister, a total enTp, being diagnosed, and if you aren't familiar, ADD is HIGHLY genetic.) Subsequently I've made researching this "disability" (which is actually recognized under the ADA) my latest mini-obsession. The reason I was struck by this description is that it reads like a complete symptom sheet for ADD (avoiding 'boring tasks' to your own detriment, losing interest 'too quickly'). I was diagnosed a few months ago ago after my parents watched my 3.8ish gpa drop to a 3.1 in less than 2 years for no apparent reason, but looking back, it's exremely clear that I've exhibited symptoms of this "disease" my entire life, but, given the structure of high school, parental oversight, etc. was able to effectively manage the "symptoms". Since accepting the fact that the negative aspects of my personality may be caused by ADD (which, despite it's somewhat negative stigma, is a 100% physiological difference between levels of activity in my frontal lobe compared to the average person), I feel like a million pounds has been lifted from my shoulders. I have also begun taking steps to address my ADD which, though very new, seem like they may be a light at the end of a darkish, unenlightened tunnel. For example, I could honestly write about this topic all day but I need to get going (I'm workign on my "time sense", a tip i got from http://www.thrivewithadd.com, and I allotted myself 10 minutes for this comment and I'm way over, big surprise.) I'd really like to hear input from any other ENFP's whove been accurately diagnosed with ADD, because from my research ADD is often misdiagnosed in adults, especially women, because on the surface it shares many symptoms with depression, anxiety disorders, etc. -- Adrian-ENFP
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