Go Back   Socionics Forums > Ramble Mumble

Ramble Mumble Anything goes, but please make an effort to stay positive and keep it socionics related.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11/10/2011, 02:45 PM
complicater-complexer's Avatar
complicater-complexer complicater-complexer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,374
Default Stamina for a competitive exam

I have a big competitive exam on saturday that is three hours long, and in the practice tests I am doing at home I get extremely tired at the third hour, but force myself to continue. Despite this, this is affecting my performance.

So I wonder do you guys have tips for increasing your stamina during a competition?
__________________
"To live happy, live hidden."
β ST, E6 autopreservation.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11/10/2011, 02:59 PM
Cyclops Cyclops is offline
Gone on holiday...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,284
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by complicater-complexer
I have a big competitive exam on saturday that is three hours long, and in the practice tests I am doing at home I get extremely tired at the third hour, but force myself to continue. Despite this, this is affecting my performance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by complicater-complexer

So I wonder do you guys have tips for increasing your stamina during a competition?


Quote:
Stamina Training


The next section of the graph is the "Stamina" section. This zone corresponds to when you are running between 30K and 8K race pace. Optimal Stamina training occurs when your heart rate is between 83 and 92% of its maximum (though this can vary from runner to runner), and oxygen consumption is 85-90% of max. In this zone, your breathing is fast but under control. The effort has been described as "comfortably hard" and your lactate level hangs around 2.5 to five millimolar, right about where your lactate threshold occurs.

Research has shown that training in the Stamina zone helps push several critical thresholds (lactate, ventilatory and anaerobic) to faster paces. The result is that you can run faster before crossing these thresholds. The key cardiorespiratory adaptations that result from Stamina training deal with what scientists call the "Lactate Shuttle". While we used to think that lactate simply started being produced and eventually accumulated to the point where fatigue sets in, we now know that lactate is always being formed, just at different rates. At rest and during light exercise, only small amounts are formed. During heavy exercise, large amounts are produced. Once formed, the body has mechanisms whereby the lactate is "shuttled" to other tissues to be used for fuel, sort of like recycling. This recycling or shuttling has a maximum capacity, however. Once reached, the production of lactate outpaces its removal resulting in the accumulation of it in the blood. Thus, the lactate threshold is reached.

I should note that lactate has a partner, a hydrogen ion. When the lactate and the hydrogen ion are together, they form lactic acid. Once produced, however, lactic acid readily splits into lactate and its former pal, the hydrogen ion. Like lactate, the hydrogen ion which causes the working muscle cells to become more acidic and begin to fatigue, is controlled, up to a limit, by the body. This process is called the bicarbonate buffering system. This system captures the hydrogen ion thereby forestalling the rise in acidity in the muscles. Once this system is overwhelmed, however, the cells become more and more acidic which interferes with energy production and leads directly to fatigue.

Stamina training helps to improve the efficiency of these two processes and over time, results in less lactate and hydrogen ions accumulating, effectively pushing your lactate threshold to a higher pace.

You experience this adaptation as the ability to run longer and faster before "going over the edge" and suffering from lactic acid overload. Research has shown over and over that the speed at your lactate threshold is the most important factor in distance running success (5K to marathon racing). Push your lactate threshold faster and you will race faster over all distances. It's therefore critical that you understand Stamina training and how to incorporate it into your program (the next two sections).

Just like in the Endurance zone, to receive the adaptations described above, you simply need to train at the paces that define the Stamina section of Graph 2.

http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/training2.htm

Last edited by Cyclops; 11/10/2011 at 03:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12/10/2011, 07:10 AM
nahbee1235's Avatar
nahbee1235 nahbee1235 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 204
Default

is it a physical type of exam?? Initially I thought you were talking about a written exam and such, but maybe not??

Anyway, if it's written exam, I'd suggest no doz, multiple shots of espresso, 5 hour energy, any energy drinks in general, chewing gum, slapping your face a few times.
If it's physical, I don't know.. you kind of have to train your body to be able to carry you through all those hours...which takes time... since you don't seem to have much time.... chew some coca leaves...it worked really well for ancient South Americans....
__________________
♫ Why is a song the world for me ♫
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12/10/2011, 08:16 AM
complicater-complexer's Avatar
complicater-complexer complicater-complexer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,374
Default

It's a long multiple choice math exam, this is a sample: http://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/GRE/p...ctice_book.pdf
__________________
"To live happy, live hidden."
β ST, E6 autopreservation.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2007 SOCIONICS.COM